Senin, 14 November 2016

Bozo, Sorogama in Mali

Bozo, Sorogama in Mali
The Bozo are a West African ethnic group located predominantly along the Niger River in Mali. The name Bozo is thought to derive from Bambara bo-so, 'Bamboo house'. They are famous for their fishing and are occasionally referred to as the "masters of the river." Rock drawings linked to the Bozo date back as far as 6,000 years, but many aspects of their current culture took shape under the 10th century Ghana Empire, when the Bozo took possession of the banks of the Niger. Though the Bozo are overwhelmingly Muslim, they preserve a number of animist traditions as well.
Ministry Obstacles
Mali is not a hospitable land to outsiders, and conditions are often harsh. Also, the Bozo identity is strongly Muslim.
Outreach Ideas
Christians can carry stories from Scripture to the Bozo tribes, and also use Gospel recordings and films.
Pray for the followers of Christ
Pray for the few Christian believers among this Bozo tribe, that they will find teachers to help them grow in the faith. Pray they will come to a good understanding of how to follow Christ. Pray they will become strong disciples.
Pray for the entire people group
Pray the Sorogama Bozo will be able to care adequately for their families, and be able to send their children to school.
Scripture Focus
"Truly I say to you, to the extent that you did it to one of these brothers of Mine, even the least of them, you did it to Me." Matthew 25:40
 

People Name: Bozo, Sorogama
Country: Mali
10/40 Window: Yes
Population: 314,000
World Population: 351,000
Language: Bozo, Jenaama
Primary Religion: Islam
Bible: Portions
Audio NT (FCBH): No
Jesus Film: No
Audio Recordings: Yes
Christ Followers: Few, less than 2%
Status: Unreached
Progress Level:

Banjara (Muslim traditions) in India

Banjara (Muslim traditions) in India
The Banjara were traditionally a nomadic community, but today they more commonly are settled and work in agricultural production. They believe that they were originally Hindu and were forcibly converted to Islam. They are non-vegetarians who eat beef. The Muslim Banjara have twelve clans. They maintain cordial relations with neighboring communities and share water sources with them. They belong to the Sunni sect of Islam.
Ministry Obstacles
To follow Jesus is to risk upsetting community harmony, and to risk losing family and friends.
Outreach Ideas
Christian workers need to build bridges of friendship and trust with the Banjara. Genuinely caring for material and physical needs is a big step in this direction.
Pray for the followers of Christ
There are probably no present followers of Jesus among the Muslim Banjara community, but pray for those the Lord will soon call to himself. Pray they will have nothing to do with the deeds of darkness, living as children of light. Pray for materials to help them grow properly, such as recorded or written Scripture, and Gospel films.
Pray for the entire people group
Pray for the Banjara community to be able to adequately care for their families, and for widows, orphans, and elderly people to have the care and protection needed.
Scripture Focus
"Let the heavens be glad, and let the earth rejoice; and let them say among the nations, 'The Lord reigns.'" 1 Chronicles 16:31
 

People Name: Banjara (Muslim traditions)
Country: India
10/40 Window: Yes
Population: 162,000
World Population: 255,000
Language: Urdu
Primary Religion: Islam
Bible: Complete
Audio NT (FCBH): Yes
Jesus Film: Yes
Audio Recordings: Yes
Christ Followers: Few, less than 2%
Status: Unreached
Progress Level:

Nosu, Xiaoliangshan in China

Nosu, Xiaoliangshan in China
Prior to 1949 the Xiaoliangshan Nosu practiced a system of slavery. "Even today, Xiaoliangshan Nosu society is a very complex system of castes, tribes and clans. In 1957 80% of the Nuo were slave owners. The remnants of these class tensions are still an undercurrent in Nosu society today." There are only a few Xiaoliangshan Nosu believers scattered over a widespread area.
Ministry Obstacles
These people may have little background needed to understand the Gospel message.
Outreach Ideas
Pray that Han Chinese believers will be motivated to build relationships with the Nosu, to befriend them and carry the Gospel to them.
Pray for the followers of Christ
Pray for the Xiaoliangshan Nosu believers to find each other and fellowship together. Pray they overcome any sense of class consciousness or inferiority. Pray they live a life of love, just as Christ loved them and gave himself up for them.
Pray for the entire people group
Pray for the Nosu to increasingly be made aware of who the creator God truly is, and what He has done to provide forgiveness and an abundant life.
Scripture Focus
"All nations you have made will come and worship before you, O Lord; they will bring glory to your name." Psalm 86:9
 

People Name: Nosu, Xiaoliangshan
Country: China
10/40 Window: Yes
Population: 532,000
World Population: 532,000
Language: Nuosu
Primary Religion: Ethnic Religions
Bible: New Testament
Audio NT (FCBH): No
Jesus Film: Yes
Audio Recordings: Yes
Christ Followers: Few, less than 2%
Status: Unreached
Progress Level:

Five-year-old dreams of heaven

Five-year-old dreams of heaven, confirms ‘Heaven is for Real’ account, Akiane’s painting of Jesus

By Mark Ellis, Senior Correspondent for ASSIST News Service
Wedding day for Mark EllisSOUTHERN CALIFORNIA (ANS - November 9, 2016) -- Her husband’s untimely death from a rare form of cancer left her reeling. As she wallowed in grief, seeking God’s presence, her five-year-old had several vivid dreams about heaven (and hell) that buoyed her faith in the Lord.
Uyen “Wyn” Tran and her husband Ton lived in Australia for 30 years following their arrival from Vietnam. He was a mechanical engineer and she a pharmacist, fulfilling their dreams in a land of fresh opportunities, when they received unexpected and devastating news.
In 2013, Ton was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer growing in his nose and throat. He was given four months to live. Ton was not a believer during their eight years of marriage, but two months before he died he accepted Jesus as his Savior and Lord.
Kieran Tran“By God’s grace he lived a year,” Wyn recounts. “When he passed away, I was so devastated. I believed with all my heart he would be healed.” Some of their friends also believed he would be healed and even thought they saw a vision of him cured, testifying about his healing.
But it was not to be. On February 13, 2014 – one day before Valentine’s Day — he passed into the arms of Jesus.
Because of Wyn’s overwhelming confidence he would be healed, Ton’s passing undercut her faith. “I held on to that (his healing) with every ounce of belief. When he actually passed away I couldn’t figure it out. For three days I was in a daze,” she says.
Paintings of Jesus“Please give me a dream or vision,” she cried out to God, desperate for His reassurance.
The dream came from an unlikely source – her five-year-old son, Kieran.
On Sunday morning Kieran woke up and came running into her room. “I saw dad and he was in heaven. It was beautiful mom. He was with God,” he said, breathlessly.
Photo captions: 1) Wyn and Ton’s wedding day. 2) Kieran Tran. 3) Akiane with Jesus paintings. 4) Mark Ellis.
Mark EllisAbout the writer: Mark Ellis is Senior Correspondent for the ASSIST News Service (www.assistnews.net),and also founder of www.GodReports.com, a website that shares stories, testimonies and videos from the church around the world. He is also co-host for “Windows on the World” with ANS Founder, Dan Wooding, which is aired weekly on the Holy Spirit Broadcasting Network (http://hsbn.tv).
** You may republish this or any of our ANS stories with attribution to the ASSIST News Service (www.assistnews.net). Please also tell your friends and colleagues that they can receive a complimentary subscription to ANS by doing to the above website and signing up there.

Bringing Hope for Survivors of Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone

Bringing Hope for Survivors of Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone


November 10, 2016
Village children in Sierra Leone.
Children benefiting from ministry outreach in Sierra Leone pay witness to the hope that many of the country's 12,000 orphans could find in Christian community.
In the West African country of Sierra Leone, many among the Muslim majority in the Northern Province offer sacrifices in hopes of keeping malevolent spirits from harming them.
They also make sacrifices to ancestors, and their traditional African religions include a creator god who is accessible only through the mediation of paternal ancestors. The ethnic Temne of the region who blend these traditional beliefs with Islam believe their ancestors judge them. They also are on the lookout for witches, trying to discern anyone whom they believe could cast spells leading to accidents, death or falling idle.
"Magical medicines" are then concocted to kill suspected witches or at least make them ill.
The director of a ministry based in Freetown, the capital of the impoverished country, requests prayer for indigenous evangelists who have been proclaiming Christ to the Temne among such cultural barriers. Their efforts in the Northern Province include villages inhabited by Roma, also called Romani, a nomadic people of Indian descent usually found in central and southern Europe, not Africa.
"My team and I have just returned from an evangelistic and mission trip to several villages in the Northern Province - one of which is the Romani village in the Kasseh Chiefdom, one of the villages badly hit by the Ebola virus, with over 50 adults that died from that disease there," said Mitford Macauley, director of Trinity Gospel Ministries. "One year after the end of the Ebola saga, you can still feel the effect of that disaster on both the people and the place. There is so much loneliness and hopelessness."
"What is most pathetic is that most of the children in this village are orphans who are struggling to survive," the ministry director said. "In the entire Kasseh Chiefdom, this village is the only one with a church."
This month marks one year since Sierra Leone was first declared free of the Ebola virus that struck in 2014-2015. Sierra Leone was the second-worst hit country in deaths from the Ebola virus, which killed more than 11,300 people in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.
The ministry introduces the hope of Christ into such despair, but the challenge of sharing Christ with a people entrenched in the traditions of Islam and ethnic religions is daunting. Evangelists also face difficult driving conditions, as roads for reaching the unreached are often primitive, not adequately maintained or nonexistent. Macauley requested prayer for a sturdy vehicle for the ministry's Jesus for the Rural World Gospel Campaign Movement, which would cost about $12,000, as well assistance to cover costs for monthly evangelistic campaigns, including transportation and feeding of team members.
"Also pray for provision of hundreds of Bibles for new, hungry disciples coming into the kingdom of God through the Jesus Rural Movement," he said.
As the kingdom grows, buildings need to be constructed for new congregations that recently formed in four villages, he said.
The Temne people of Sierra Leone are considered unreached (defined as less than 2 percent evangelical Christian), according to the Joshua Project, which lists them as 61 percent Islamic and 35 percent ethnic religions.
The Ebola outbreak of 2014-2015 exacerbated conditions for the Sierra Leone's poor, who are now in crisis due to food shortages and inflation. A recent United Nations report noted that 3.5 million people, about half the country's population, lack enough food. About 600,000 of these are "severely food insecure," according to the report. Analysts point to 60 percent unemployment that is not expected to improve soon with austerity measures pending.
Macauley said the poor in Sierra Leone have faced further challenges since Ebola wrecked the country's economic progress.
"Before Ebola, our economy was being celebrated worldwide as one of the fastest growing economies, but all of this has changed," he said. "Inflation has reached the highest ever. Presently there is a lot of suffering in the masses barely surviving. Quite recently, hundreds of people were scrambling at a dumpsite in Freetown for rotten chicken that was to be destroyed by the Sierra Leone Ports Authority."
New Christians prepare for baptism in Sierra Leone.
New Christians prepare for baptism in Sierra Leone.
Ministry workers note that parents are finding it increasingly difficult to come up with school fees for their children's education.
"All of these and more are issues that need the divine intervention of God, and we ask you all to pray for us," Macauley said. "Pray for a divine touch upon the economy of Sierra Leone, which has reached its lowest point at this time due to the post-Ebola effects."
The Ebola crisis is estimated to have orphaned more than 12,000 children in Sierra Leone. The village in the Kasseh Chiefdom that Macauley and his team recently visited was full of them.
"What is most pathetic is that most of the children in this village are orphans who are struggling to survive," he said. "In the entire Kasseh Chiefdom, this village is the only one with a church, so we are planning to return to minister the love of God to them."
Closer to Freetown, workers are building an orphanage to minister to the needs of children who have lost their parents to the Ebola virus. Macauley thanked Christian Aid Mission for start-up funds for the project, which still requires $50,000 for completion.
"Like the Father's heart, which is so enlarged towards orphans, so are our hearts becoming, the more we consider the situation of Ebola orphans, especially when we see lots of them around in towns and villages and the unfavorable conditions surrounding them," he said. "This makes the orphanage project an urgent one."
To help indigenous missionaries to meet needs, you may contribute online using the form below, or call (434) 977-5650. If you prefer to mail your gift, please mail to Christian Aid Mission, P.O. Box 9037, Charlottesville, VA 22906. Please use Gift Code: 530TGM. Thank you!

Growing Hope

Kenyan children holding mosquito nets.
Mosquito nets provided by a ministry in Kenya’s Great Rift Valley protect children from serious diseases and smooth the way for hearing the gospel. The ministry brings children from area villages to school to be trained, empowered and cared for in a Christian environment, the indigenous organization’s director said. “We received 15 more children this term, and seven of them were totally orphaned,” he said. Introducing the gospel to unreached tribes where idolatry and local traditions present strong opposition, the ministry recently planted a church in western Kenya among ethnic Teso; intercessory prayer led to supernatural healing that broke the stronghold of area powers, he said. “A total of 26 people came to Christ, and we baptized 12 people,” he said. “Pray with us for the provision of $2,500 to construct this church building. Pray also for the pastor that we have sent to this village. Ask the Lord for the provision of materials and spiritual support for this work, as they work in this very difficult environment.”

Qashqai, Kashkai in Iran

Qashqai, Kashkai in Iran
The Qashqai are a tribal confederation of clans in Iran. The Qashqai were originally nomadic pastoralists but most are now settled, or partially settled. Historically, the Qashqai are believed to have come from Central Asia, and may have been among the Turkic groups that arrived in Iran in the 11th or 12th centuries. They are renowned for their magnificent pile carpets and other woven wool products.
Ministry Obstacles
Iran is not hospitable to Christian workers; access is limited.
Outreach Ideas
Gospel radio and television, evangelistic websites, Gospel recordings and literature can all be useful.
Pray for the followers of Christ
Pray for the followers of Jesus among the Quashqai to grow in their love for Christ and for each other. Pray their faith will be nourished by the Spirit of Christ.
Pray for the entire people group
Pray for the good news about Jesus to reach the ears of the Qashqai community in an understandable way, in their mother tongue.
Scripture Focus
"Through whom we have received grace and apostleship to bring about the obedience of faith for the sake of his name among all the nations." Romans 1:5
 

People Name: Qashqai, Kashkai
Country: Iran
10/40 Window: Yes
Population: 930,000
World Population: 930,000
Language: Kashkay
Primary Religion: Islam
Bible: None
Audio NT (FCBH): No
Jesus Film: No
Audio Recordings: Yes
Christ Followers: Few, less than 2%
Status: Unreached
Progress Level: